Learning Disabilities

Better working to support people with learning disabilities

Across Surrey we are working towards greater integration of health and social care for people with learning disabilities, in order to improve the service they receive.

This will mean creating a single team across Surrey County Council and the NHS, with staff receiving information and training on supporting people with a learning disability and/or autism and it will be a contractual requirement that services are able to accommodate their needs.

One of the key aims of our work is to ensure that more people can live in the community, with the right support, and closer to home.

To help achieve this, we have our county-wide Learning Disability Partnership Board, a county-wide Autism Partnership Board and the Learning Disability and Autism Programme Delivery Board.

We are also committed to service user and carer engagement and this is done through our local Valuing People groups.

 

Transforming Care

Surrey Heartlands CCG is working hard to make sure that fewer people with learning disabilities and/or autism will need to go into hospital for their care by improving services in the community.

We have plans in place for the discharge from all CCG beds for adults with learning disabilities and/or autism and, where people do need to stay in hospital, we will work to ensure their care is the best it can be so they can be discharged as soon as possible.

We have a small local Forensic community team (FIND) for people who have forensic support needs with a learning disability and/or autism and we are currently in discussion with our local providers with regards to providing settled accommodation and support for people with these needs.

We are also working in partnership with health, social care and our provider partners to:

  • Develop discharge pathways and community alternatives to hospital stays.
  • Carry out Care (Education) and Treatment Reviews (CTRS and CETRS) to ensure that all those involved in a person’s care and treatment are acting to ensure that the person can be discharged from hospital as soon as they are well enough to leave.
  • Conduct eight week visits for all adults and six week visits for all children and young people in out-of-area inpatient settings to ensure they benefit from increased focus on their care.
  • Maintain the quality of our learning disability and autism inpatient facilities. We will be working with Experts by Experience service users and carers to check the quality of our local services.

There is further information available on the following links:

https://www.england.nhs.uk/wp-content/uploads/2015/10/ld-serv-model-er.pdf

https://www.england.nhs.uk/wp-content/uploads/2017/02/easy-read-model-service-pec.pdf

https://www.england.nhs.uk/wp-content/uploads/2017/03/my-care-treatment-review-symbol-updated.pdf

 

Acute liaison and reasonable adjustments

When people are ill and need to go into hospital they may find it difficult to explain their symptoms. They may not be comfortable with the hospital environment and as a result may not receive the care they need.

Surrey Heartlands CCG is working in partnership with all our local hospital trusts in order to develop services which provide reasonable adjustments to help people with learning disabilities receive high-quality care.

Examples include making sure that every acute hospital has both adult and paediatric learning disability liaison nurses.

Please check with your local trust to see what services we have put in place to help you and your family receive the best care.

Royal Surrey County Hospital 

Frimley Park NHS Foundation Trust

East Surrey Hospital             

Ashford St Peters

Epsom St Helier                      

Surrey and Borders NHS Foundation Trust

 

Annual Health Checks

People with a learning disability often have poorer physical and mental health than other people. An annual health check can improve people’s health by spotting problems earlier.

All people with a learning disability are entitled to be registered on the GP learning disability register. From age 14 + they will be offered an enhanced annual health check.

Our new Primary Care Networks will be working hard to:

  • Increase the numbers of people with learning Disabilities having an annual flu vaccination.
  • Increase the numbers of people having the enhanced health check.
  • Reduce the use of unnecessary medication ( STOMP)

 

LeDer

Surrey Heartlands CCG is part of the national Learning Disability Mortality Review (LeDeR) Programme. The LeDeR programme is commissioned by the Healthcare Quality Improvement Partnership (HQIP) and funded by NHS England. 

The aim of the programme is to support local areas to review the deaths of people with learning disabilities (aged four years and above), identify learning from those deaths, and ensure services are developed in order to address any learning from the review. The University of Bristol is contracted to establish and develop the review process and evaluate the findings. 

For more information on the programme please click HERE.  

Anyone can report the death of a person with a learning disability to the LeDeR programme.  All deaths of people with learning disabilities who are aged four years and above should be reported.  Deaths can be reported via:

Eileen Clark, Deputy Director for Quality and Nursing and Kathryn Fisher, Head of Integrated Learning Disability Commissioning are the Local Area Contacts (LACs) for the Surrey Heartlands CCG programme.

They can be contacted at This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it. and This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it..

 

You can read the latest LeDeR Annual Report to get an overview of the LeDeR programme and how this has been implemented in our local area. It provides an overview of the number of deaths that have been reported to LeDeR for these areas and summaries the learning that has come from the completed reviews.

 

Carer support

Providing care for someone with a learning disability can be very demanding and it is important to ensure that you make time to look after your own health and well-being, not least because in many cases carers support their loved one for the rest of their life. Across Surrey, support is available to help the person you care for reach their full potential, and to support you and your family.

Speaking to people who are facing similar challenges to you can help you make sense of things. Having a network of people who you can turn to for advice and support can be very helpful. Key to all this is understanding the rights you have as a carer enshrined in the Care Act 2014 and the Children & Families Act 2014. There are many things you will want to consider including planning for the future.

Please click here for more advice on services and support available to you.

 

Model Publication Scheme Class: Not part of the MPS